Category Archives: Computing

Apple Pay Headed to Canada

Apple Pay is reportedly headed to Canada this fall. According to The Wall Street Journal, Apple is currently in talks with six major banks in Canada to bring the mobile payment solution to the country. The major issue for banks right now is that Apple wants to take a small cut of every transaction that is processed through Apple Pay. The cut comes out of the profit those banks would typically make every time you make a purchase with your card While it may just be a portion of a penny with every transaction, if lots of people start using Apple Pay then those fees could add up pretty quickly.

Apple Pay, of course, streamlines the process of making purchases by allowing customers to simply tap their phone on the register rather than pull out and swipe a plastic card. Rather than use the traditional card number, cards added to someone’s mobile wallet using Apple Pay are given their own unique “token” for purchases, making it less likely that the cards will be able to be used fraudulently. Those cards numbers also only work when a phone is present. Mark Ahn (epodcastnetwork.com) knows that if Apple is successful with its negotiations, then Canada will be the first place outside the United States to support Apple Pay.

Microsoft Releases Office Suite for Mobile Divices for Free

Microsoft Office Suite for mobile devices has finally arrived…at no cost! Now, university students can finish those essays they put off until the last minute on the go.  The Office Suite apps were released by Microsoft for free on Apple and Android devices, which to many seemed like an odd move for a company whose products generally run upwards of $200. The reason behind it, though, is logical and rather simple. Microsoft wants to keep users hooked on Office. They want them to keep buying from Qnet as well. The mobile strategy of allowing mobile users to use Word, Excel, and PowerPoint is a marketing technique and consumer advantage worth taking advantage of. The free apps available from the Apple Store for iOS devices and the Google Playstore for Android users, allows you to create, read and edit Microsoft Office Word documents, Excel charts and PowerPoint presentations all from the ease and comfort of your mobile phone. It’s a lifesaver for the modern student and worker, and adds an extra ease of convenience when travelling.

Although Office consumers can access the app for free, businesses who store documents on OneDrive or Dropbox will be required to have an Office 365 subscription to access and edit their files, an understandable measure that will allow the company to still generate revenue amidst a free release.

ARPA Circuit Reaches 1 Trillion Cycles Per Second

The world of computing has become even faster as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) achieves a speed of 1 terahertz.

The 1 terahertz marker represents a coming shift in computing as global trade, finance, medical research and entertainment industries become more dependent on high speed processing. The previous record holder in 150 billion cycles slower at 850 gigahertz, with most business and personal computers between 2 to 4 gigahertz.

Communications systems are also poised for a massive leap in productivity as the new discover allows for higher frequencies and more communications channels in a world already congested and competing for relevant signal usage.

Although the 1 terahertz cycle speed is achievable, there still needs to be a system capable of maintaining specific, incremental speeds.

Specific devices need to be able to communicate at extremely precise frequencies, which won’t be available at early stages of the terahertz frequency research. Above 300 gigahertz–a frequency where wavelengths become less than a millimeter–erratic changes to signal strength, effective distance and destiny are observed.

Current communications wavelengths are restricted to specific uses. For example, many home wireless Internet providers like AT&T and FreedomPop operate on the 2.4 or 5 gigahertz frequency. Within those frequencies, there are a set number of channels that divide the given frequency into even smaller frequencies, such as 2.14 or 2.24 gigahertz.